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Since 1732, the Redemptorists — a congregation of missionary priests and brothers — have followed in Jesus’ footsteps, preaching the Word and serving the poor and most abandoned.
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Monthly Archives: January 2010
Thursday

After some anxious hours, the Redemptorists rejoice at the news that their 41 confreres in the Port-au-Prince Region in Haiti are all safe. One Redemptorist was slightly hurt in the earthquake that devastated the capital city, and at least one other lost several family members.

News about family and friends continues to be slow in coming, and the Redemptorists of the Baltimore Province continue to keep our novice, Jacky, in our prayers as he awaits word of his family and friends.

St. Gerard Church in Port-au-Prince, which serves a population of about 100,000 of modest means, is in ruins, according to Very Rev. Mário Boies, provincial superior of the Province of Sainte-Anne de Beaupré (Quebec, Canada). Haiti is a region within the Quebec province. St. Gerard Parish also includes the residence of the Redemptorist regional superior.

A newly constructed part of the student residence was also destroyed. The students are currently living in the garden.

If you would like to make a gift to the Redemptorists to help them with relief and recovery efforts in Haiti, please make a donation for General Ministry Support using our online donation form. Please mark the gift as in honor of Haiti. Any online donations marked for Haiti will go directly to help the Redemptorists on the ground in Port-au-Prince.

The Port-au-Prince region includes 19 priests, 1 deacon, 2 perpetually professed Brothers, 19 professed students and 5 pre-novices. The median age of Redemptorists in the province is 34.

In addition to St. Gerard parish, Redemptorists care for two parishes in the diocese of Cayes (Château and Fonfrède); and three parishes on the island of Guadeloupe (Immaculée in Grand Bourg, Saint Louis in the town of Saint Louis and Sainte-Anne in Capesterre).

Thank you for your generosity and may Our Mother of Perpetual Help be with all those impacted by this tragedy.

Wednesday

Redemptorists of the Baltimore Province are praying for the thousands of people affected by the massive earthquake that devastated Port-au-Prince, the Haitian capital, January 12. We pray especially for our fellow Redemptorists of the Haitian province who have been heroic in their efforts to help people live their faith and to address the serious social concerns in the country.

We pray in thanksgiving for the safety of one of our seminarians, Jacky Merilan, a native of Port-au-Prince, who is in his novitiate year at St. Alphonsus Villa in Glenview, IL. We continue to pray for the safety of his family and friends.

Baltimore Provincial Patrick Woods has committed to making a donation to assist our Haitian confreres in the recovery efforts.

“If you wish to contribute, I can assure you the money will go directly to our men in Haiti who will use it to help ease some of the terrible suffering those already very impoverished people are experiencing,” Father Woods said. “A great patron of the people of Haiti is Our Mother of Perpetual Help. I ask your prayers to Our Mother that she brings comfort to her suffering children.”

If you would like to make a gift to the Redemptorists to help them with relief and recovery efforts in Haiti, please make a donation for General Ministry Support using our online donation form. Please mark the gift as in honor of Haiti. Any online donations marked for Haiti will go directly to help the Redemptorists on the ground in Port-au-Prince.

Thank you for your generosity and may Our Mother of Perpetual Help be with all those impacted by this tragedy.

Tuesday

Father Albert Lamote died January 12 at Princess Margaret Hospital in Dominica at age 97.

Born January 7, 1913, Father Lamote professed vows as a Redemptorist September 15, 1934, and was ordained to the priesthood December 20, 1941.

Funeral arrangements are pending.

Please pray for the repose of the soul of Father Lamote, and for the comfort and peace of his family, fellow Redemptorists, and friends who mourn his loss.

Tuesday

Redemptorist Father Albert Lamote, a Belgian who devoted his priestly ministry to the people of the Caribbean, died Tuesday, Jan. 12, at a nursing home in Dominica. Father Lamote, who had survived a German prison camp, was 97 years old.

Father Albert Joseph Francis Xavier Lamote, the son of Alberic and Helena Vangaver Lamote, was born Jan. 7, 1913, in St. Kruis Village, West Flanders, Belgium. He joined the Brussels Province of the Redemptorists, taking his first profession of vows in 1934 and his final profession in 1937. He studied at the University of Louvain and was ordained to the priesthood on Dec. 20, 1941, a year after the Nazi Army invaded and began to occupy Belgium.

Many years later, Father Lamote confided to Father Lawrence Lover the story of how he had been imprisoned by the Nazis, marked for execution, and freed just the day before his scheduled death. Father Lamote attributed his timely liberation to the intercession of Our Lady of Perpetual Help and for the rest of his life was unfailing in promoting devotion to her.

In 1948, the Brussels Provincial Superior assigned him to work in the Vice-Province of Roseau, which was based in Dominica and included several other islands. A decade later, when his compatriot, Father Charles Vermeulen, was sent out to Roseau, the trip still took 11 days by sea, he said, and the ship was too large to dock on the tropical island. The last part of the journey was by small boat from ship to shore, Father Vermeulen explained.

For the first 30 years of Father Lamote’s ministry in the Caribbean, Dominica was a colony of Great Britain, gaining its independence only in 1978. By 1985, the Province of Brussels could no longer staff and support the Vice-Province of Roseau and asked the Redemptorist General Government in Rome for relief from this responsibility. At the request from Rome, the Baltimore Province incorporated the foundations in Roseau. In 1999, the English-Speaking Region of the Caribbean was established, still part of the Baltimore Province but with their own local governing structure.

Through all these changes, Father Lamote became a Caribbean man, not a foreign missionary to the people, but a pastor among them. “He was a very gregarious priest and he loved to be with people,” said Father Joseph Krastel.

“He loved to visit them in their homes and talk with them in the streets. He loved the people and the people loved him.” Father Krastel noted that his confrere “wrote copiously and kept huge ledgers,” compiling what could serve as a history of the Redemptorists and the people of Dominica over the past 60 years.

Father Krastel also recalled that Father Lamote served in Antigua in the late 1970s and enjoyed riding a motor bike to visit his parishioners.

According to Brother Gerard St. Hilaire, who was one of Father Lamote’s altar servers at St. Patrick Church in Grand Bay, Dominica, the priest had a real gift for drawing the youth to church activities. “He loved swimming and going on picnics with the altar servers,” he said. “He also liked working with his hands; he loved building things like pulpits.” Brother Gerard noted that Father Lamote also was a favorite with the ladies who worked with the Legion of Mary.

ICM Sister Lovina Reyes, serving now in Jamaica, spent several years working in Dominica when Father Lamote was in Grand Bay. His prayer life, she wrote, “will always be an inspiration to me; his ‘dry’ humor and his expression of joy/excitement — ‘uyuyuyuyuy’ will always make me smile.”

Among the countless babies Father Lamote baptized over the years is Father Glanville Joseph. “I love Father Lamote; he was like a father to me,” Father Joseph said. “He was the people’s priest and the people loved him wherever he went.” When the Caribbean Region was established, the Redemptorists serving there were given a choice of returning to their home Province or becoming part of the new region under the Baltimore Province. Father Lamote asked Father Joseph: “If I stay in Dominica, will you take care of me when I’m old?” (Father Lamote was a vigorous 86 at the time.) The younger confrere assured the senior priest that he would.

According to Father Joseph, Father Lamote later had to undergo surgery and he was plagued with migraine headaches, yet he was still bringing Communion to the sick at age 95. During his recent hospitalization, Father Joseph said he could see “the agony on his face, but he never complained … the nurses loved him. He was so humble in everything he did.”

Father Joseph summed up Father Lamote’s missionary zeal by saying, “He came to the people of the Caribbean and he loved us with an unconditional love.”

 

Rev. Albert Lamote, C.Ss.R.

  • Born: January 7, 1913
  • Professed: September 15, 1934
  • Ordained: December 20, 1941
  • Died: January 12, 2010

 

Services

Funeral Mass
January 26
4 p.m.
St. Patrick Church
Grand Bay, Dominica

Burial
January 27
11 a.m.
Roseau, Dominica

Saturday

Father Sylvester Edward Feeley, a Redemptorist for 66 years and a former vice provincial of Puerto Rico, died January 9 at age 87.

A native of Jersey City, NJ, Father Feeley was born May 11, 1922. He professed first vows as a Redemptorist August 2, 1943, and was ordained to the priesthood June 20, 1948.

Viewing will be held January 12 from 4 to 9 p.m. at the Basilica of Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Brooklyn, NY. A prayer service will be held at 7:30 p.m.

A funeral Mass will be celebrated January 13 at 10:30 a.m. at the basilica. Father Feeley will be buried in the Redemptorist cemetery at Mount St. Alphonsus in Esopus, NY.

Please pray for the repose of the soul of Father Feeley, and for the comfort and peace of his family, fellow Redemptorists, and friends who mourn his loss.